Do Not Ride on Hwy. 29 south of St. Helena

About a week ago our son was riding on Hwy. 29 south of St Helena right where the railroad tracks cross the highway diagonally when a car swerved close to him. He swerved on his bike and speeded up to get  away from the car. The tire of his bike caught in the track causing him to take a nasty fall. Landing on his right arm, he broke his wrist so severely that he had a bone sticking out. The car did not stop or even hesitate. Fortunately, our son was able to phone his girlfriend to pick him up and take him to the hospital emergency room in St. Helena. That night he had one surgery on his arm to stabilize it.

Early the next week an orthopedic surgeon here (central Contra Costa County) put a metal plate, screws, and  pins in his arm to connect the broken bones. Needless to say he has suffered from pain and the temporary loss of use of his right arm, and he will permanently have an arm full of metal. The moral of this story is avoid roads with narrow shoulders and walk your bike over railroad tracks. Do not take risks on your bicycle!

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My Favorite Town

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Danville at the Corner of Hartz and Prospect

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We ride from north of Alamo to Danville more than we do any other ride, mostly to run errands and to go to the farmers’ market on Saturdays. Although we live in Walnut Creek on the Alamo line, I grew up in Danville and it still seems like home to me. It is easier to shop there than it is in Walnut Creek, and although it has grown unbelievably, there is still a small-town feeling about Danville. Most of the people who work in the stores are friendly and accommodating, such as the guys at Pegasus Bicycle Works and the people at the little candy store on Prospect Avenue. When I took these pictures, we were sitting in front of Starbucks, which is located where the Bank of America used to be. Across the street from where we were sitting there was a grocery store called Acree’s, which disappeared a long time ago. But the Veteran’s Hall that once housed the library where I fed my reading habit when I was a kid is still there, and even with the new hotel construction there is one building that has been retained from the old Danville Hotel. After our Saturday rides, we often enjoy lunch at Blue Line Pizza where I can gaze out at the buildings that were homes to real families at one time. While we don’t run into people we know as much as we once did, we still often see friends and acquaintances as we mosey around enjoying a sense of community.